June 2017 News

Pakistan Asks India To Respect 2003 Ceasefire Accord

29 June 2017
The Nation


Islamabad: Pakistan on Thursday asked India to respect the 2003 ceasefire agreement as the foreign ministry summoned a senior Indian diplomat to protest against the violations along the Line of Control (LoC). The Indian firing, a foreign ministry statement said, killed a civilian and injured four others on June 28. The statement said that Director General South Asia and South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation Dr Mohammad Faisal summoned Acting Indian Deputy High Commissioner S Raghuram and 'condemned the unprovoked ceasefire violations by the Indian occupation forces in Nikial Sector on June 28.' It said the Indian firing resulted in the death of one civilian, Abdul Wahab, a resident of Dothilla Village, and injuries to four others, Muhammad Shakeel, Muhammad Arshad, Asif Mahmood and Safira Bibi Mohra Village. 'The deliberate targeting of civilians is indeed deplorable and contrary to human dignity and international human rights and humanitarian laws,' the foreign office said in the statement. The Director-General urged the Indian side to respect the 2003 ceasefire arrangement, 'investigate this and other incidents of ceasefire violations; instruct the Indian forces to respect the ceasefire in letter and spirit and maintain peace on the LoC.' Pak-India tension has been running high since last July after the killing of freedom fighter Burhan Wani. The Indian forces later killed dozens of protesters who condemned the murder. In September, the tensions rose further when New Delhi blamed Pakistan for the Uri attack, which inflicted the heaviest toll on the Indian army in a single incident in 14 years. Nineteen soldiers were killed in the strike. Pakistan denied any involvement in the incident. Since partition in 1947, Pakistan and India have been involved in four wars - including one undeclared war - and many border skirmishes and military stand-offs. Kashmir has been the main cause of tension. In the recent months, conviction of Indian spy Kulbhushan Jadhav has heightened the tension. A Pakistani military court had sentenced the Indian spy to death in April. Jadhav, a Research and Analysis Wing agent, was found guilty of terrorism and espionage. India approached the International Court of Justice which granted a stay on Jadhav's execution until a final verdict. Pakistan has raised objections to ICJ's jurisdiction to hear Jadhav's case as it was linked to Pakistan's security. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi met US President Donald Trump this week where Washington asked Pakistan to stop terrorists from using its soil against other countries. The US also imposed sanctions on Hizbul Mujahideen chief Syed Salahuddin. The State Department said the US now considered Salahuddin, also known as Mohammad Yusuf Shah, a 'Specially Designated Global Terrorist.' Pakistan rejected the India-United States joint notification on Salahuddin. Foreign Office spokesperson Nafees Zakaria said the designation was non-favourable for peace and stability in South Asia. He said it was unacceptable to brand Kashmiris' struggle for freedom, terrorism. Zakaria said that Trump-Modi meeting was an opportunity to ask India to quit peace-compromising policies. He said that sale of advanced weaponry to India would trigger her into a coercive campaign against Pakistan. International relations expert Dr Pervez Iqbal Cheema said that war was not a solution to Pak-India issues so the two must sit down together to find ways to refuse the tension. He said the world must take notice that India was the aggressor and Pakistan was calling for dialogue at all forums. 'India is violating the LoC and the Working Boundary. They must stop this to ensure an environment for talks. Pakistan has to respond to India firing, we cannot sit silent,' he said. Cheema said that India was attempting to divert the world's attention from the Kashmir dispute. 'They (India) are not ready to allow anyone as a mediator. The Kashmir issue has to be resolved for peace,' he maintained. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi met US President Donald Trump this week where Washington asked Pakistan to stop terrorists from using its soil against other countries. The US also imposed sanctions on Hizbul Mujahideen chief Syed Salahuddin. The State Department said the US now considered Salahuddin, also known as Mohammad Yusuf Shah, a 'Specially Designated Global Terrorist.' Pakistan rejected the India-United States joint notification on Salahuddin. Foreign Office spokesperson Nafees Zakaria said the designation was non-favourable for peace and stability in South Asia. He said it was unacceptable to brand Kashmiris' struggle for freedom, terrorism. Zakaria said that Trump-Modi meeting was an opportunity to ask India to quit peace-compromising policies. He said that sale of advanced weaponry to India would trigger her into a coercive campaign against Pakistan. International relations expert Dr Pervez Iqbal Cheema said that war was not a solution to Pak-India issues so the two must sit down together to find ways to refuse the tension. He said the world must take notice that India was the aggressor and Pakistan was calling for dialogue at all forums. 'India is violating the LoC and the Working Boundary. They must stop this to ensure an environment for talks. Pakistan has to respond to India firing, we cannot sit silent,' he said. Cheema said that India was attempting to divert the world's attention from the Kashmir dispute. 'They (India) are not ready to allow anyone as a mediator. The Kashmir issue has to be resolved for peace,' he maintained.

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